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I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought, there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you.
Frida Kahlo
Our works are very much pro-life. We would question, however, any policy that is more pro-fetus than actually pro-life. If the rights of the unborn trump all of the rights of all of those who are already born, that is a distortion too — if there’s such an emphasis on that. However, we have sisters who work in right to life issues. We also have many, many ministries that support life. We dedicate to our lives to those on the margins of society, many of whom are considered throw-away people: the impaired, the chronically mentally ill, the elderly, the incarcerated, to the people on death row. We have strongly spoken out against the death penalty, against war, hunger. All of those are right to life issues. There’s so much being said about abortion that is often phrased in such extreme and such polarizing terms that to choose not to enter into a debate that is so widely covered by other sectors of the Catholic Church — and we have been giving voice to other issues that are less covered but are equally as important.
Sister Pat Farrell, on today’s Fresh Air
workaholics:

From the bottom of my heart, with all due respect, and that’s not a lot, I mean it, I really want you to know, that me?  Me, personally, I want you to look around the room, then back to me, realize I’m talking to you, then make sure it’s eye-to-eye, then, with all love sent from above and below, please…

workaholics:

From the bottom of my heart, with all due respect, and that’s not a lot, I mean it, I really want you to know, that me?  Me, personally, I want you to look around the room, then back to me, realize I’m talking to you, then make sure it’s eye-to-eye, then, with all love sent from above and below, please…

nprfreshair:

Just some Friday afternoon thoughts.

nprfreshair:

Just some Friday afternoon thoughts.

I had read a beautiful story in The New York Times about the couple who were getting married, and that Mayor Bloomberg was going to preside over their wedding at Gracie Mansion. And my friend called me and said, ‘They’d love to have you come and sing.’ And I was floored. I was so honored. And I cried like a baby at that ceremony. And I brought my daughter. And it was a very moving moment and a very teachable moment having my daughter there. And as far as she was concerned, it was just another wedding. She doesn’t really see the issue, which is great. So that’s how it came about. It was a beautiful day.
Audra McDonald on performing at the first legal gay wedding in New York City. [full interview here] (via nprfreshair)
nprfreshair:

How Common Is Your Birthday?
(via @stiles)
nprfreshair:

hwentworth:

Internet’s over, people.  Maurice Sendak just won.

Fresh Air remembers Maurice Sendak

nprfreshair:

hwentworth:

Internet’s over, people.  Maurice Sendak just won.

Fresh Air remembers Maurice Sendak

librarianheygirl:

Thanks Erica.  (True story.)

librarianheygirl:

Thanks Erica.  (True story.)

A lot of white people like black people. They buy hip-hop, they watch black athletic and sports figures and it’s super popular — from jazz through hip-hop. Having a black friend is a mark of progressive success as a white person. And the black person is usually seen as their asset. It’s like: I’m cooler by proxy.